Some People Flip Real Estate. I Flip Men.

Woman just wanting some 810247

Share Take, for example, the common belief that women are more committed to family than men are. Research simply does not support that notion. Other research, too, makes it clear that men and women do not have fundamentally different priorities. Numerous studies show that what does differ is the treatment mothers and fathers receive when they start a family. If men do ask, say, for a lighter travel schedule, their supervisors may cut them some slack—but often grudgingly and with the clear expectation that the reprieve is temporary. Accordingly, some men attempt an under-the-radar approach, quietly reducing hours or travel and hoping it goes unnoticed, while others simply concede, limiting the time they spend on family responsibilities and doubling down at work. Either way, they maintain a reputation that keeps them on an upward trajectory. Meanwhile, mothers are often expected, indeed encouraged, to ratchet back at work. It is what they experience at work once they become parents that puts them in very different places.

The Way Forward This culture of burn the candle at both end punishes not just women but additionally men, although to a lesser amount. Only by recognizing and addressing the problem as one that affects altogether employees will we have a ability of achieving workplace equality. We heard this explanation a few years back from a global consulting firm so as to, having had no success with off-the-shelf solutions, sought our help in accept how its culture might be hampering its women employees. The firm recruits from elite colleges and MBA programs and ranks near the top of lists of prestigious consultancies, but akin to most other professional services firms, it has few female partners. We worked with the firm for 18 months, during which time we interviewed consultants—women and men, partners and associates. Women were held back because, unlike men, they were encouraged to take accommodations, such as going part-time and broken up to internally facing roles, which derailed their careers. The real culprit was a general culture of overwork so as to hurt both men and women after that locked gender inequality in place.