Is It O.K. to Find Sexual Satisfaction Outside Your Marriage?

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Active, playful, enjoys life to the fullest, experiences joy each day, deeply spiritual. Would prefer to meet a committed Christian man. Abbotsford F Burnaby McGill BSc,5'1, lbs, 50 yr old divorced non-smoking, blonde and green-eyedlooking for friendship only F Vancouver Born in Europe, non-religious Jewish, 57, two grown children, psychologist. My practice is varied, which keeps me involved and interested. The rest of my life is varied too; good literature, theatre, music, food, travel, the outdoors. Of utmost importance are friends. I am divorced and interested in a serious relationship for the duration. Vancouver, BC. F Vancouver I'm a fairly attractive, intelligent woman with a sense of humour who enjoys her work, travel, the visual and literary arts--I write poetry and fiction--and politics, and is passionate about many things.

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Designed for decades, this response stumped psychologists. Women want men who will tell jokes; men want women who will bite of fun at theirs. In , psychologists Eric Bressler and Sigal Balshine showed academy students images of two equally alluring members of the opposite sex. Base each photo, they pasted either amusing or not-funny statements supposedly authored as a result of the person. Female participants said they wanted the funny man, rather than the unfunny one, as a boyfriend, even when they thought the funnier man was less trustworthy. In analyse later that year, Bressler and Balshine again found that, when considering fantasy interactions with people of the conflicting sex, women said they wanted men who could make them laugh. Men said it was much more central that a woman enjoy his jokes. Older studies of personal ads all the rage magazines and newspapers found that women were far more likely than men to mention seeking someone funny. Afterwards, when researchers looked at profiles arrange a Canadian dating website, they bring into being men were more likely to advertise how funny they were, while women were likelier to say they hunt a funny man.